Essays On Theme For English B By Langston Hughes

Essays On Theme For English B By Langston Hughes-31
His poems "I, Too" and "Theme for English B" both advanced his political views of equal civil rights and treatment under the law for African-Americans.Both poems use first-person voices; however the "I" is different for each poem, in order to fulfill Hughes' purpose for the poem.A rhyming poem, “Theme for English B” is, however, ready to abandon its rhymes.

His poems "I, Too" and "Theme for English B" both advanced his political views of equal civil rights and treatment under the law for African-Americans.

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Hughes narrates in the voice of a young African-American man writing a college theme, or English composition paper, responding to the prompt to “let that page come out of you….then, it will be true (Hughes, 45-50).” This young but self-assured, reflective, and cautiously hopeful narrator describes his southern past and his current life in New York, as well as his different pleasures in life, before addressing his English teacher and discussing the role of national identity in resolving racial and cultural conflict.

Discussion Appearing near its center is the brief “Theme for English B,” whose familar vocabulary and speech ryhthms make it read like something we might hear every day.

It also shows that the landlord could care less of what condition his building is in as long as the money is still coming in.

"Well, that's Ten Bucks more'n I'll pay you / Till you fix this house up new." (Hughes 11/12) In Langston Hughes' "I, Too", written in 1925, the speaker in the poem is a young black male.

The poem is also one piece of the long poem Montage of a Dream Deferred.

It was written in Harlem in 1948, and published in 1951.

Another one of Langston Hughes' poems, "Dinner Guest: Me", written in 1965, is almost a continuation of "I, Too".

The speaker in "Dinner Guest: Me" seems to be the same one, except this time that pride that we saw in his face is gone.

On closer inspection, we realize that the poem's themes are challenging, its patterns of rhythm, rhyme and sound refined.

These marks of effort will never, however, remove from the poem its accessibility.

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